Martial Arts Builds Confidence in Teens. Here is why.

The thought of teenagers applying martial art training against a bully conjures up images of planned chaos resulting in extreme physical harm. However the opposite is true.

When a young adult puts in the time to train in the physical moves of the martial arts he or she will learn the medical implications of those moves, but they will also come to understand the anatomy of emotions, theirs and the bullies. On the physical end they will learn balance, focus, timing, rhythm, and coordination. They will come to understand the limitations and frailties of their bodies and that of the bully. But they will also learn to respond and not react, that thinking is slow and that muscle memory is fast. Most important they will retain their martial art training as a secret knowledge only to be used when there is no other option.

Self-defense physical and emotional:
The physical move comes with a lesson in the law of motion; that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. If they punch to the stomach the bully bends in the middle thrusting his face forward. Emotional self-defense teaches that a calm mind manifests as a calm physical response not the scared effect the bully intended and that calm words defuse.

Who is this young adult trained in the martial arts? He or she moves with ease among their peers. They understand that many, young and old alike, are filled with fear on many levels, and may have the need to lash out verbally and possibly physically. The young martial artist is not afraid of confrontation and through training has learned to manage their own fears so that they can contribute calm to an often-turbulent world.